Overview of the teaching programme

Study plan providing a list of course modules with descriptions, curriculum and ECTS for all relevant courses offered by the University of Rennes1 (France).
Coordination: Dr Cécile Le Lann & Prof Philippe Vandenkoornhuyse (see contacts)

Current teaching program (period 2017-2021)

First year (M1)
Master EFCE : Functional, Behavioral and Evolutionary Ecology

Semester 1 Semester 2

Mandatory teaching units

  • Population biology: 6 ects
  • Behavior ecology and evolutionary ecology: 6 ects
  • Community Ecology and ecosystem functioning: 6 ects
  • Statistical and methodological tools: 6 ects

2 teaching units to be chosen among 5

  • Initiation to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): 3 ects
  • Introduction to modeling: 3 ects
  • Spatial analyses in ecology: 3 ects
  • Automatic data analysis (Python programming): 3 ects
  • Modern Analytical tools in ecology: 3 ects

Mandatory teaching units

  •  Scientific communication: 3 ects
  •  Scientific English: 3 ects
  •  Internship (from April to June): 12 ects
  •  employment : finding an internship: 0 ects

2 teaching units to be chosen among 8

  •  Functional responses of organisms to environmental constraints: 6 ects
  •  Landscape Ecology: 6 ects
  •  Restoration Ecology: 6 ects
  •  Aquatic ecology (freshwater systems): 6 ects
  •  Micro-organisms and ecosystems: 6 ects
  •  Dynamic and evolution of genes and genomes: 6 ects
  •  Modeling in Ecology and Evolution: 6 ects


Second year (M2)

Semester 3

Mandatory teaching units

  •  Ecology and Evolution of communities – global changes: 3 ects
  •  Evolution of behaviors and life history traits: 3 ects
  •  Biodiversity, flux and ecosystem functioning: 3 ects
  •  Sciences and society: 3 ects
  •  Scientific approach: bibliographic analysis and review writing: 12 ects
  •  Scientific English: 3 ects
  •  employment : finding a position: 0 ects

1 teaching unit to be chosen among 4

  •  Mass sequencing in Ecology : concepts, strategies and data analyses: 3 ects
  •  Population genetics and genomics: 3 ects
  •  Modeling in Epidemiology: 3ects
  •  Statistical analyses in Ecology (advanced analyses): 3 ects

Semester 4

Obligatory Master thesis in a research laboratory (6 month) (from January to June): 30 ects


Year 2: semester 3

Ecology and Evolution of communities – global changes

Knowledge and associated skills: The teaching unit will provide key information required to understand the effects of global changes (agriculture, climate) on species assemblages and the dynamics of diversity at various spatial and temporal scales. Biological invasions are considered in terms of the process involved and the resulting consequences. The teaching unit will address the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms involved in the dynamics of diversity (assembly rules), indicating the importance of biotic interactions. Trait selection and the concept of functional traits will be investigated, particularly in relation to ecosystem functioning and the notion of indicator species. Implementation of methods used in community ecology, phylogeny and landscape ecology. Understanding the mechanisms underlying biological diversity. Analysis of the effects of habitat management modalities on communities.

Critical analysis of published articles.
Teaching Hours: 31 hours
Educational content:
- Responses of communities in landscape dynamics, constraints and human activities
- Community responses to stress and disturbance, particularly in the context of climate Change
- Ecological and evolutionary consequences of invasive species
- Evolutionary and ecological mechanisms involved in the dynamic diversity (assembly rules)
- Dynamics of biotic interactions
- Links structure-function features of response and effect traits
- Methods of analysis, scale changes
- Critical analysis of published articles


Biodiversity, functioning and flow in ecosystems

Knowledge and associated skills: Understanding the role of biodiversity in the functioning (biological, chemical, physical) of ecosystems: Interpreting and measuring biodiversity in habitats and evaluating its changes; Quantification of the role of organisms in nutrient biological cycles in the biosphere:  pathway transfers, regulatory mechanisms; Analysis of the responses of ecosystems to changes in biodiversity. Conservation and ecosystem functioning.
Teaching hours: 30h
Educational content:
Teaching unit based on an original, project-based learning (PBL) approach tutored by a specialist. Topics to be chosen from those available in the teaching unit. Students will choose a topic that is not related to their research internship, provide the knowledge themselves and compile.
Suggested topics (not exhaustive)
-carbon cycle and global warming
-adaptive radiation
-diversity and ecosystem productivity
-modeling in functional ecology
-place of virome in ecosystems
-transfer of genes, resistance, resilience
-bioremediation teaching unit ...


Evolution of behaviors and life history traits

Knowledge and associated skills:Understanding the evolution of functions and behavioral traits and of phenotypic and behavioral strategies; Mastering the concepts of modern theories of evolutionary biology, particularly in the context of phenotypic models (evolutionary stable strategies...) Understanding the mechanisms at the origin of biodiversity and how to trace its history: evolution of reproductive systems, speciation, phylogeny, phylogeography; Knowing how to interpret the methods used and data obtained from behavioral ecology, mathematical modeling and phylogenies.
Teaching unit hours: 30h
Educational content:
-Sociality: Advantages and disadvantages of group living. The influence of resource distribution and group size. Balance between competition and predation risk.
-Social organization: choice of social partner and the sexual partner. Different types of social organization, sexual selection, cooperation, role of kinship.
-Parental care and sex resource allocation. Parental investment, resource sharing between sexes, influence of parents’ longevity, the role of social status, kin selection.
-The choices related to dispersal and population dynamics. Which disperses (sex, age, social status)? With what and when? What are the choices of destination? Selection criteria (quality of physical and social environment, role of kinship)? Philopatry. Impact on population dynamics.
-Value Adaptive behaviors. Mathematical models of behavioral adaptation. Examples will be taken from the following areas: Optimal supply Sexual selection, parental investment
-Learning and value of information. The different types of learning. The evolution of learning. Learning and environmental variability.
-Modeling the evolution of the main parameters of population dynamics (survival, fecundity, age at maturity, ...)
-Theory applied to the evolution of games. Concept of ESS.  EHS research. Application to the evolution of sex ratio, dispersal, social behavior, levels of selection. Concept of inclusive fitness. Selective conflicts. Signatures of selection on genomes
-Speciation. Origin and history of species: Evolution of mating systems, speciation data,
genomic and population history and species


Elements of the scientific process: the literature review

Knowledge and skills associated: This teaching unit is supervised by an academic tutor. It provides an opportunity for each student to use common means of literature searching to compile a folder on a given topic ( related to his/her future research internship during semester 4), to synthesize and criticize the literature analyzed, to write a rigorous and logical review of the literature, and then present this analysis orally in front of a public within a limited time, using appropriate visual aids.
Responsible teaching unit Françoise Burel & Philippe Vandenkoornhuyse
Teaching unit hours: 30h
Educational content:
How to access and use bibliographic databases and how to grasp a research question from analysis of the bibliography


Sequencing mass Ecology: Concepts and Strategies Analysis

Knowledge and skills associated: Introduce the various mass sequencing techniques used in ecology and evolution; Be aware of the different approaches used, and the nature of the information provided, to be able to assess the relative quality of the data; Know the sources of information used to identify organizations and determine their functions. What are their areas of application and their limitations? ; Master the concepts and acquire practical skills in the use of tools to characterize the function and taxonomy of an anonymous sequence; Initiate the use of sequencing data for mass modeling in ecology and an approach to integrative ecological genomics.
Teaching Hours: 30h
Educational content:
-Introduction Environmental genomics (course): Background, potential, developments,
current and future examples of major international projects; Presentation of mass sequencing techniques ; Description approaches (metagenomics, single-cell approach metatranscriptome, amplicons).
- Pre-sequencing considerations : Objectives and experimental design, characteristics of communities studied, Meta-data and integration with measurements of environmental parameters.
-Treatment Produced sequences: Filtration and sequence trimming. Clustering pattern sequences and depletion curves, assembly sequences.

Functional and taxonomic characterization sequences : Identification of functional genes Annotations.
- Communities Analysis : Analysis of amplicons and diversity of communities (e.g. use mothur) Sorting sequences and identification of dominant populations, links between diversity and function, identification of biotic interactions, Reconstruction and modeling of biochemical networks.


Genetics and Population Genomics

Knowledge and associated skills: This module aims to (1) provide an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of genetic variability within and between populations, understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of this variability by joint application of modeling and observation and (2) control the statistical tools and software available for data analysis in genetics and population genomics
Teaching Hours: 30h
Educational content:
Population genetics: history, rationale and application
Molecular markers
Genetics of dispersion and landscape
Genetic and reproductive system
Models of molecular evolution, substitution rate
Phylogenetic reconstruction
Phylogeography and historical demography
Adaptive differentiation: from population genetics to quantitative genetics
Molecular inference of selection: from gene to genome
The theory of coalescence
Modeling and analysis of genetic networks


Statistical Analysis in Ecology

Knowledge and related know-how: Know and master the advanced data analysis methods used in fields of ecology.
Teaching hours: 24 (12 hours of practicals)
content:
General linear -model
Generalized linear -model
-Methods Analyzes multi-tables
-Introduction Neutral models


Study plan with a list of courses modules with descriptions, curriculum and ECTS given for all relevant courses from Aarhus University (Denmark).
Contact person: Dr Jesper Givskov Sørensen (see contacts)

The study program consists of 120 ECTS and is described in details at the University homepage (https://mit.au.dk/EDDI/webservices/DokOrdningService.cfc?method=visGodkendtOrdning&dokOrdningId=3484&sprog=en). In case of doubt or discrepancies the Aarhus University study program is the one in force.
The structure of the Master’s degree programme in Biology at Aarhus University.
First year (4 quarters) of 60 ECTS Elective courses
Second year (4 quarters) Master thesis amounting to 60 ECTS credits for experimental theses.

Ecophysiology (Q3 Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54225/

Advanced Population Ecology (Q1)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/50391/

Stream ecology (Q1 Q2)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/51201/

The Ecology of Lakes
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54224/

Molecular Population Genetics (Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/44714/

Modeling of biological processes (Q3)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54218/

Models and monitoring data in nature and environment management (Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54217/

Marine mammal ecophysiology (Q3)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54213/

Wildlife ecology and management (Q3 Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/55074/

Evolutionary Ecology (Q1)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/50341/

Evolutionary genetics - adaptation and conservation (Q2)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/51151/

Evolutionary behaviour and game theory (Q2)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/51120/

Experimental Population Biology (Q1 Q2)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/50355/

Experimental Coastal Ecology (Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54209/

Conservation Genetics (Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54205/

Biological Project (10/15 ECTS) (Q1 Q2/Q3 Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54203/
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54204/

Behavioural Biology (Q3 Q4)
http://kursuskatalog.au.dk/en/coursecatalog/Course/show/54198/


Study plan with a list of course modules and descriptions for the MSc Ecology at Vrije Universiteit (VU) (Netherlands). The courses are part of the track “Ecology and evolution” a joint specialization of VU and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (UvA)
Contact person: Prof Jacintha Ellers (see contacts)

First year
VU -UvA Master Ecology: specialization‘Ecology and Evolution’ 2016 - 2017

Semester 1 January and Semester 2

Mandatory teaching units

  • Soil-Plant- Animal Interactions 6 ects
  • Experimental Design & Analysis 6 ects

1 teaching units to be chosen among 3

  • Microbial Ecology: 6 ects
  • Ecosystem Services & Scientific Advocacy: 6 ects
  • Spatial Processes in Ecology and Evolution: 6 ects

1 teaching units to be chosen among 2

  • Evolution of Species Interactions: 6 ects
  • Ecotoxicology and Water Quality: 6 ects

Mandatory teaching units

  • Research project I : minimal 30 ects

 

Mandatory teaching units (or to be chosen in Semester 4)

  • Literature Thesis: 12 ects
  • Scientific English: 3 ects

Second year

Semester 3 January and Semester 4

Mandatory teaching units

  • Current Trends in Evolution 6 ects
  • Masterclasses in Ecology and Evolution 3 ects
  • Experimental Design & Analysis 6 ects (Mandatory only if no statistics course has been taken in 1st year of MSc)

1 teaching units to be chosen among 2

  • Microbial Ecology: 6 ects
  • Spatial processes in ecology and evolution: 6 ects

1 teaching units to be chosen among 2

  • Environmental Genomics and Adaptation: 6 ects
  • Ecotoxicology and Water Quality: 6 ects

Mandatory teaching units

  • Research project I : minimal 30 ects

 

Mandatory teaching units (or to be chosen in Semester 2)

  • Literature Thesis : 12 ects
  • Scientific English: 3 ects

Year 2: semester 3

Current Trends in Evolution

The aim of the Master’s course Current Trends in Evolution is:

By the end of the course, the student has obtained:

Course content:

Teaching forms: Lectures, workgroups, computer practical 1 x 4 hours

 

Master classes in Ecology and Evolution

The goal of this course is to obtain a broad overview of the latest research in ecology and evolution. Students will be taught:

Course content:

Being able to participate in discussion is an important skill for scientists. It requires the ability to combine theoretical and empirical knowledge as well as a critical view on the arguments put forward by others. The best way to improve these skills is to practice them under supervision of senior scientists. In this course students are trained to discuss the important topics in Ecology and Evolution with top scientists in the world, in the form of a masterclass (described below). In doing so, students will attend seminars from these internationally renowned scientists in the Nature of Life meetings organized by the Institute of Ecological Sciences (VU) and in the series of IBED lectures organized by the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (UvA). Both series are organized on a monthly basis throughout the year (except the summer period). The topics for the seminars cover the whole spectrum of ecology and evolution. An overview of upcoming and previous seminars can be found at www.falw.vu.nl/nl/onderzoek/ecological-sciences/nature-of-life-meetings/index.asp and www.science.uva.nl/ibed-agenda/see.cfm. Students must attend six masterclasses during the 2-year programme. Students may attend more theme lectures on a facultative basis, subject to availability.

Teaching forms

In preparation for each masterclass, several recent papers by the guest speaker will be studied and extensively discussed during a tutorial meeting with staff members of the Institute of Ecological Sciences or of the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics. Students then participate in a discussion meeting with the speaker (the actual masterclass), and finally they attend the seminar as part of the course. Students are required to participate actively in the discussion during the tutorials, masterclass and the seminar.

 

Experimental Design and Analysis

By the end of this course, students will:

Course content

An appropriate experimental design combined with a suitable statistical analysis is essential to biological science, even though it is considered by many as a necessary evil. In this course, the whole chain from hypothesis and design to analysis and interpretation is covered to allow students to apply a range of statistical techniques independently, the basis being application and implementation of the techniques (in R). Possible experimental designs are discussed in relation to specific biological questions and hypotheses. The application of statistical analysis is treated in relation to these designs. Theories, and especially the assumptions underlying the test, are treated to the extent that this information is necessary to correctly apply the tests. Combinations of regression and analysis of variance techniques and methods of multivariate analysis, such as unconstrained and constrained ordination and meta analysis, will be examined. Other biological questions like classification issues, working with large datasets, data reduction and multiple response variables are discussed.

Teaching forms

As application is considered central to this course, case studies, assignments and working with real biological data form the core of this course. Starting with the research question, hypothesis and the lab/field/model situation, an appropriate design and statistical analysis will be discussed. A specific case study will then be used by the researcher who performed that particular research, to illustrate this chain of arguments. Theory, assumptions and tests will all be treated in the context of these case studies and coupled directly to the case study and subsequent assignments. The course will end with application of the theory to an extensive case study.

 

Microbial Ecology

The aim of the Master’s course is to provide students with insight into microbial diversity and microbial ecology emphasising the use of state-of-the-art omic-tools in this field.

Study goals :

Course content

The vast majority of life on this planet is microbial. Microbial organisms are huge in numbers, biomass and diversity, and Earth's evolution is tightly linked to microbial evolution and activities. We are also becoming increasingly aware of the importance of microbial ecology in the practical issues of society and the environment, ranging from human health, nutrition and energy supply, to understanding and predicting climate change.

However, our knowledge of microbial diversity and activities in the environment is still limited, mostly due to the difficulties associated with studying microbes (because of their small size and the difficulty of isolating and cultivating them in the laboratory). Fortunately, recent breakthroughs in the application of methods from molecular biology and genomics (including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) are now beginning to provide better ways of studying the diversity and activities of microbes in their environment.

The course will first provide a brief history of microbial ecology, and outline the general characteristics of microbes and microbial communities. It will then highlight the most important methodological approaches that have been essential to recent advances in microbial ecology. Special attention will be paid to the rapidly increasing influence of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Several important examples will then be presented regarding the role of microbial ecology in key environmental issues, including the effects of global climate change, pollution and other anthropogenic pressures on ecosystems.

Teaching forms

The course starts with a series of lectures (in English) on different topics in microbial ecology. In addition, students will choose a subject related to one of the topics in the lectures, look up relevant literature, summarize this in an essay and present it as a short movie. The students will also have a one-day excursion and a one-day practical.

 

Spatial Processes in Ecology and Evolution

Objectives of the course Spatial Processes in Ecology and Evolution are:

Course content

The course will start with a week of lectures that provide an overview of how almost all relevant processes in ecology and evolution are inherently spatial. Topics include: dispersal strategies in plants and their evolution; the influence of migration on metapopulation dynamics and persistence; spatial genetics; the lasting impact of past population fluctuations; large-scale patterns in species diversity. In the afternoons, computer practicals will acquaint students with the R statistical framework and programming language.

In the second week, students will have computer practicals where they get an in-depth look at Species Distribution Modeling, to see how statistical tools can be used to model the distributions of species based on a set of spatial explanatory variables. Students will learn how these models can be used to make habitat suitability models for a species under different scenarios of global change, including climate change and changes in land-use. Besides these practicals, they will study papers relevant to the discussed topics.

Finally, the students will learn how the techniques learned in the previous week can be applied to answer a range of questions in other fields of ecology and evolution. What are the effects of a change in species distribution on the distribution of genetic variation? How does the response to climate change of a species depend on its dispersal capabilities, demography and dispersal strategy? Can we also use these techniques to model past distributions of species? Do these models match with the large-scale patterns in biodiversity?

Teaching forms:

Lectures, practical (computer) assignments, studying selected papers, discussions and seminars.

 

Environmental Genomics and Adaptation

The aim of this course is to teach students to:

Course content:

Researchers in ecology and physiology are making extensive use of molecular techniques. Environmental genomics can be applied to advance our understanding of the way organisms functionally respond to changes within their local environment. Such responses may have consequences for species abundance, community diversity, and the evolution of speciation. In this course we will focus on: The regulation of gene expression. Which genes are turned on in response to environmental challenge, and what do they do? Differences in the molecular basis of fitness between individuals. Is there intraspecific variation in gene expression in response to environmental change, and is this variation adaptive? We will also assess the evolutionary consequences of genomic variation. What are the ecosystem-, community-, and population-level consequences of molecular transformations within the genome? Does gene family expansion and contraction drive speciation, or does the emergence of new gene bodies and protein domains add to speciation?

We will follow topics covered by chapters in the book `An Introduction to Ecological Genomics' and include molecular adaptation to drought, genetic marker development and analytical methods, evolution of metal tolerance, and speciation genetics. Practical training includes a gene expression experiment, designed and executed by the students. Also, a computer exercise on transcriptomics (microarray data) will be performed, using data extracted from peer-reviewed scientific papers. Finally, a journal club will be organized, in which students present a scientific paper on an Ecological Genomics topic. In order to address up-to-date and state-of-art knowledge on ecological genomics topics, specialists in this field will be invited to give guest lectures.

Teaching forms:

 

Ecotoxicology and Water Quality

The aim of this course is enable students to:

Course content

This course focuses on the effects of contamination of aquatic ecosystems, from the molecular chemistry of major groups of toxicants to their impacts at the molecular, cellular, individual, population, and ecosystem levels.

The first part of the course is a laboratory practical, in which students gain hands-on experience in ecotoxicity testing by applying methods used in bacteria, aquatic invertebrates and fish. Both whole-organism and molecular biological techniques are taught. Students will evaluate scientific literature and the results of their experimental research to assess the risk of environmental contaminants for ecosystem health. At the end of the practical, students will present the results of their experimental work in a poster presentation.

The second part of the course is theoretical and will teach the student the state of the art in ecotoxicology. It is designed as a scientific symposium with invited lectures presented by internationally renowned guest lecturers as well as PhD candidates who present their PhD research in ecotoxicology. Students take the role of chairperson during the symposium and introduce the speakers, ask questions and discuss critical issues. Topics include emerging compounds, molecular mechanisms of toxicity, community effects, global environmental problems, and chemical regulation. Scientific literature will be given as background information on each topic. The symposium is finalized with oral presentations in which students present a critical evaluation of the topics.

Teaching forms:

Laboratory practicals and Lectures (introduction to practicals scientific symposium)

 

Scientific Writing in English

The aim of this course is to provide Master’s students with the essential linguistic know-how for writing a scientific article in English that is well organized idiomatically, stylistically appropriate and grammatically correct.

At the end of the course students

Final texts may contain occasional spelling, grammatical or word choice errors, but these will not distract from the general effectiveness of the text.

Course content:

The course will start with a general introduction to scientific writing in English. Taking a top-down approach, we will then analyze the structure of a scientific article in more detail. As we examine each section of an article, we will peel back the layers and discover how paragraphs are structured, what tools are available to ensure coherence within and among paragraphs, how to write effective and grammatically correct sentences and how to choose words carefully and use them effectively.

Teaching forms

Students will work through a phased series of exercises that conclude with the requirement to write several text parts. Feedback on the writing assignments is given by the course teacher and by peers.


• Current Trends in Evolution (AMU_0003, 6 ec)
http://studiegids.uva.nl/xmlpages/page/2015-2016/zoek-vak/vak/14969
• Soil-Plant-Animal Interactions (AM_470507, 6 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=50044092
• Experimental Design and Analysis (AM_470505, 6 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=50044095
• Master classes in Ecology and Evolution (AM_1016, 3 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=50722368
• Scientific Writing in English (AM_1157, 6 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=51167681
• Environmental Genomics and Adaptation (AM_470506, 6 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=50044093
• Spatial Processes in Ecology and Evolution (AMU_0009, 6 ec)
http://studiegids.uva.nl/xmlpages/page/2015-2016/zoek-vak/vak/17175
• Microbial Ecology (AMU_0008, 6 ec)
http://studiegids.uva.nl/xmlpages/page/2015-2016/zoek-vak/vak/19637
• Ecosystem Services and Scientific Advocacy (AM_1053, 6 ec)
http://www.vu.nl/nl/studiegids/2015-2016/master/e-f/ecology/index.asp?view=module&origin=50722290&id=51003051
• Evolution of Species Interactions (AMU_0006, 6 ec)
http://coursecatalogue.uva.nl/xmlpages/page/2014-2015-en/search-course/course/7171


MSc-study programme providing a list of courses modules with descriptions, curriculum and ECTS given for all relevant courses from Gottingen University (Germany)
Contact person: Prof Dirk Gansert (see contacts)
    

First Year:

Semester 1 (Winter Term):

Mandatory teaching unit: Biodiversity (Part I): 6 C

Key competencies: 6 C

One module in complementary studies: 6 C

 

Major studies (1 out of 7, 30 ECTS in the first year)                                              

1) Plant Ecology, Phytodiversity & Vegetation History

Focus I: Experimental Plant Ecology & Ecosystems Research, 30 ECTS
Mandatory module (total 6 C): Plant ecology & ecosystems research (M.Biodiv.402) 6 C
Core modules (total:12-24 C):   Project course plant ecology (M.Biodiv.421) 6 C
     Impact of global climate change on plant communities and their
     functional traits (M.Biodiv.450) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total: 0-12 C): Forest ecosystems (M.Forst.1695) 6 C
                                                                      Soils of the earth (M.Forst.1654) 6 C
                                                                      Soil hydrology practice (M.Forst.1656) 6 C
                                                                      Stable isotopes in terrestrial ecology (M.Forst.1674) 6C
          Genetic ressources and physiology of woody plants (M.Forst.1213) 6 C

 

Focus II: Vegetation Ecology, Phytodiversity & Vegetation History, 30 ECTS
Mandatory module total (6 C): Vegetation ecology and vegetation history (M.Biodiv.403) 6 C
Core modules (total 12-24 C): Regional vegetation ecology and phytodiversity (M.Biodiv.406) 6 C
                                                Project study: Palaeoecology and palynology (M.Biodiv.430) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Ecology and nature conservation (M.Agr.0052) 6 C
                                                              Soils of the earth (M.Forst.1654) 6 C
                                                              Problems of utilisation of natural resources (M.Geg.02) 6 C                                                                       

2) Animal Ecology

Mandatory module (6 C): Animal ecology (M.Biodiv.404) 6 C

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Evolutionary ecology (M.Biodiv.441) 6 C
                                                Biodiversity and ecology of terrestrial invertebrates (M.Biodiv.) 6 C

Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Biological control and biodiversity (M.Agr.0009) 6 C
                                                              Ecology and nature conservation (M.Agr.0052) 6 C
                                                              Forest ecosystems (M.Forst.1695) 6 C
                                                              Soils of the earth (M.Forst.1654) 6 C
                                                              Stable isotopes in terrestrial ecology (M.Forst.1674) 6 C
                                                              Genetic resources and physiology of woody plants (M.Forst.1213) 6 C

3) Evolution

Mandatory module (6 C): Evolutionary biology (M.Biodiv.415) 6 C

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Morphology and anatomy of vertebrates (M.Biodiv.471) 6 C
                                                Evolutionary ecology (M.Biodiv.441) 6 C
                                                Introduction into behavioural biology (M.Bio.346) 6 C

Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Anthropology I: Structure analysis (M.Biodiv.505) 6 C
                                                              Anthropology II: Palaeogenetics (M.Biodiv.506) 6 C
                                                              General and applied microbiology (M.Bio.101) 12 C
                                                              Palaeobiology and biodiversity I (M.Geo.111) 6 C

 

4) Animal Systematics, Morphology & Behaviour

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Electron microscopy (M.Biodiv.470) 6 C
                                                Morphology and anatomy of vertebrates (M.Biodiv.471) 6 C

Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Anthropology I: Structure analysis (M.Biodiv.505) 6 C
                                                              Palaeobiology and biodiversity I (M.Geo.111) 6 C

5) Plant Systematics, Taxonomy, Phylogeny

Focus 1: Embryophyta, 30 ECTS
Mandatory module (6 C): Evolution of embryophyta (M.Biodiv.425) 6 C
Core modules (total 12-18 C): Molecular evolution in embryophyta (M.Biodiv.427) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 6-12 C): Project studies in plant systematics, evolution & phylogeny (M.Biodiv.490) 6 C
 
Focus 2: Pro- and Eucaryotic Algae, 30 ECTS
Mandatory module (6 C): Pro- and eucaryotic Algae: Evolution and systematics (M.Biodiv.418) 6 C
Core modules (total 12-24 C): Algae (M.Biodiv.419) 6 C
   Evolutionary ecology (M.Biodiv.441) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total0-12 C): General and applied microbiology (M.Bio.101) 12 C

 

6) Nature Conservation Biology

Mandatory module (6 C): Nature conservation biology (M.Biodiv.412) 6 C
Core modules (total 12-24 C): Nature conservation inventories (M.Biodiv.480) 6 C
   Assessment of wildlife species for nature conservation (M.Biodiv.483) 6 C
   Basics of ecology and planning in forest conservation (M.Forst.1211)
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Impact of global climate change on plant communities and their functional traits (M.Biodiv.450) 6 C
  Biological control and biodiversity (M.Agr.0009)
  Ecology and nature conservation (M.Agr.0052)
  Problems of utilization of natural resources (M.Geg.02)

 

7) Forensic Biology

Mandatory module (6 C): Biological and forensic trace interpretation (M.Biodiv.500) 6 C

Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Anthropology I: Structure analysis (M.Biodiv.505) 6 C
  Anthropology II: Palaeogenetics (M.Biodiv.506) 6 C               
  Vegetation ecology and vegetation history (M.Biodiv.403) 6 C
  Algae (M.Biodiv.419)
  Impact of global climate change on plant communities and their functional traits (M.Biodiv.450) 6 C
  Morphology of animals: Electron microscopy (M.Biodiv.470) 6 C
  Morphology and anatomy of vertebrates (M.Biodiv.471) 6 C
  Biodiversity and ecology of terrestrial invertebrates (M.Biodiv.) 6 C
  General and applied microbiology (M.Bio.101) 12 C

 

 

Semester 2 (Summer Term):

Mandatory teaching unit: Biodiversity (Part II): 6 C

Key competencies: 6 C

 

Major studies (continued)                                         

1) Plant Ecology, Phytodiversity & Vegetation History (continued)

Focus I: Experimental Plant Ecology & Ecosystems Research, 30 ects
Core modules (total:12-24 C): CO2- and H2O-balance of trees (M.Biodiv.422) 6 C
   Study of habitats (M.Biodiv.423) 6 C
   Field studies in plant ecology, phytodiversity & ecosystems research (M.Biodiv.424) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total: 0-12 C): Applied vegetation ecology & multivariate analysis (M.Biodiv.431) 6 C
                                                               Nature conservation in an agricultural landscape (M.Agr.0061) 6 C
                                                               Modern methods in ecology (M.Forst.1263) 6 C
                                                               Soil microbiology practice (M.Forst.1657) 6 C
                                                               Ecological modelling (M.Forst.1685) 6 C

 

Focus II: Vegetation Ecology, Phytodiversity & Vegetation History, 30 ects

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Applied vegetation ecology & multivariate analysis (M.Biodiv.431) 6 C
                                                Field studies in phytodiversity, vegetation ecology & palaeoecology (M.Biodiv.435) 6 C
                                                Project study: Vegetation and phytodiversity (M.Biodiv.436) 6 C

Supplementary modules (0-12 C): Study of habitats (M.Biodiv.423) 6 C
                                                      Nature conservation in an agricultural landscape (M.Agr.0061) 6 C
                                                      Computer-based data analysis (M.Forst.1424) 6 C
                                                      Landscape ecology and ecozones in theory and practice (B.Geg.901) 6 C
                                                      Landscape development in theory and practice (M.Geg.902) 6 C
                                                                            
2) Animal Ecology (continued)

Core modules (12-24 C): Synecology of animals (M.Biodiv.442) 6 C
                                        Field studies in animal ecology and zoological biodiversity (M.Biodiv.443) 6 C
                                        Molecular analysis of trophic interactions in soil food webs (M.Biodiv.445) 6 C

Supplementary modules (0-12 C): Primate ecology (M.Biodiv.408) 6 C
                                                      Modern methods in ecology (M.Forst.1263) 6 C
                                                      Soil microbiology practice (M.Forst.1657) 6 C
                                                      Ecological modelling (M.Forst.1685) 6 C
                                                             

3) Evolution (continued)

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Evolutionary developmental biology (M.Bio.349) 6 C
                                                                                                                                                          
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Primate ecology (M.Biodiv.408) 6 C
                                                              Biosedimentology (B.Geo.209) 6 C
                                                              Palaeoecology (M.Geo.103 112 (Biodiv)) 6 C
                                                              Palaeobiology and biodiversity II (M.Geo.113) 6 C             

 

4) Animal Systematics, Morphology & Behaviour (continued)

Mandatory module (6 C): Phylogenetic systematics and evolution (M.Biodiv.477) 6 C

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Forensic entomology (M.Biodiv.474) 6 C
                                                Biodiversity and systematics of marine animals (M.Biodiv.475) 6 C
                                                Field studies in animal systematics, ecology & biodiversity (M.Biodiv.476) 6 C

Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Palaeoecology (M.Geo.103 112 (Biodiv)) 6 C
                                                              Field studies in animal ecology and zoological biodiversity (M.Biodiv.443) 6 C
                                                              Palaeobiology and biodiversity II (M.Geo.113) 6 C

 

5) Plant Systematics, Taxonomy, Phylogeny (continued)

Focus 1: Embryophyta, 30 ECTS

Core modules (total 12-18 C): Reproduction and evolution of flowering plants (M.Biodiv.426) 6 C
   Molecular determination of biodiversity of algae and their evolution (M.Biodiv.460) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 6-12 C): Biodiversity & biogeography of embryophyta (M.Biodiv.428) 6 C
  Next generation sequencing for evolutionary biology (M.Biodiv.491) 6 C
  Palaeobiology and biodiversity II (M.Geo.113) 6 C
  Evolutionary, developmental biology (M.Bio.349) 6 C

           

Focus 2: Pro- and Eucaryotic Algae, 30 ECTS

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Molecular determination of biodiversity of algae and their evolution (M.Biodiv.460) 6 C
   Ex situ conservation of biodiversity of algae (M.Biodiv.461) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Field studies in plant ecology, phytodiversity & ecosystems research (M.Biodiv.424) 6 C
  Palaeobiology and biodiversity II (M.Geo.113) 6 C
  Soil microbiology practice (M.Forst.1657) 6 C

 

6) Nature Conservation Biology (continued)

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Field studies in nature conservation biology (M.Biodiv.482) 6 C
   Ornithology (M.Biodiv.488) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Study of habitats (M.Biodiv.423) 6 C
                                                                      Applied vegetation ecology & multivariate analysis (M.Biodiv.431) 6 C
  Synecology of animals (M.Biodiv.442) 6 C
  Landscape ecology and ecozones in theory and practice (B.Geg.901) 6 C
  Nature conservation in an agricultural landscape (M.Agr.0061) 6 C
  Forest functions, forest conservation, and recreational planning of forests (M.Forst.1262) 6 C
  Landscape development in theory and practice (M.Geg.902) 6 C

 

7) Forensic Biology (continued)

Core modules (total 12-24 C): Forensic anthropology and demonstration of dissection (M.Biodiv.501) 6 C
   Analyses of trace-DNA - genetic fingerprinting and quality assurance (M.Biodiv.502) 6 C
   Forensic microbiology (M.Biodiv.503) 6 C
   Palynology and analyses of macro-relics (M.Biodiv.504) 6 C
   Forensic entomology (M.Biodiv.474) 6 C
Supplementary modules (total 0-12 C): Study of habitats (M.Biodiv.423) 6 C
                                                              Synecology of animals (M.Biodiv.442) 6 C

 

 

Incoming IMABEE-Students (second year) at Göttingen University

 

Semester 3 (Winter Term):

Mandatory teaching unit: Scientific project management and specific research methods: 6 C

Complementary studies (24 C): 4 modules to be chosen out of 24

Complementary studies: 4 modules to be chosen out of 24 

L:= Lecture; P:= Practice; S:= Seminar

Module number Title Credits

Semester

week hours

M.Biodiv.402 Plant Ecology and Ecosystem Research
6
4
402.1
402.8
402.4
402.6
L: Vegetation and ecology of the earth
L: Ecosystem research, C-balance, and global warming
S: Current topics in plant ecology and nature conservation
S: Aut-and synecology of plants: the tropics
3
3
3
3
M.Biodiv.403 Vegetation Ecology and Vegetation History
6
4
402.1
403.1
403.3
403.4
L: Vegetation & ecology of the earth
L: General and plant sociological vegetation ecology
S: Applied vegetation ecology of the Mediterranean (annual alternation with 403.4)
S: Modern issues of vegetation science in agricultural landscapes
3
3
3
3
M.Biodiv.404 Animal Ecology
6
4
404.1
404.2
L: Animal ecology
S: Topics in animal ecology and evolution
3
3
M.Biodiv.406 Regional Vegetation Ecology and Phytodiversity
6
4
406.1
403.3
403.4
L: Habitat types of the FFH-Guideline
S: Applied vegetation ecology of the Mediterranean (annual alternation with 403.4)
S: Modern issues of vegetation science in agricultural landscapes
3
3
3
M.Biodiv.412 Nature Conservation Biology
6
4
412.1
412.2
412.3
L: International nature conservation
L: The song of the Dodo - Origins of Conservation Biology
S: Botanical nature conservation and environmental care
3
3
3
M.Biodiv.418 Pro- and Eucaryotic Algae: Evolution and Systematics
6
4
418.1
418.2
L: Phylogeny and systematics of plants and algae: biology and phylogeny of algae
S: Plant systematics & phycology
3
3
M.Biodiv.421 Plant Ecology: Project Course Plant Ecology
6
8
421.1
421.2
L: Basics of planning, performance, and analysis of ecological research projects, and scientific writing
P: Scientific analysis and publication of plant ecological data
1.5
4.5
M.Biodiv.425 Evolution of Embryophyta
6
4
425.1
425.2 / 418.2
L: Speciation and evolution of land plants
S: Plant systematics and phycology
3
3
M.Biodiv.427 Molecular evolution in embryophyta
6
4
P: DNA fingerprinting techniques for land plants
L: Introduction into molecular markers
4.5
1.5
M.Biodiv.430 Vegetation History: Project Study in Palaeoecology and Palynology
6
8
430.1
430.2
S: Current topics in palynology and climate dynamics
P: Palaeoecology and palynology
3
3
M.Biodiv.435 Vegetation Ecology and Vegetation History: Field studies in Phytodiversity, Vegetation Ecology, and Palaeoecology (specific announcement)
6
8
435.1
435.2
S: Phytodiversity and palaeoecology of a natural and culture area
P: International field studies
3
3
M.Biodiv.436 Vegetation Ecology: Project Study of Vegetation and Phytodiversity (individual arrangement)
6
4
436.1
436.2
S: Current topics in vegetation ecology and phytodiversity
P: Vegetation analysis and phytodiversity
3
3
M.Biodiv.441 Animal Ecology: Evolutionary Ecology
6
8
441.1
441.2
L: Evolutionary ecology
P: Evolutionary ecology - experiments
3
3
M.Biodiv.
Animal Ecology: Biodiversity and Ecology of Terrestrial Invertebrates
6
4
L/P: Ecology of terrestrial invertebrates
6
M.Biodiv.450 Plant Ecology: Impact of global climate change on plant communities and their functional traits
6
8
L: Impact of global climate change on plant communities
P: Impact of global climate change on plant communities
3
3
M.Biodiv.480 Nature Conservation Biology: Nature Conservation Inventories
6
8
480.1
480.2
L: Nature conservation inventories
P: Nature conservation inventories
3
3
M.Biodiv.483 Nature Conservation Biology: Assessment of Wildlife Species for Nature Conservation
6
8
483v.1
483.2
L: Theoretical background of population assessment
P: Analysis, interpretation, and management of stand data
3
3
M.Biodiv.490 Project studies in plant systematics, evolution and phylogeny
6
4
P: Research project
6
M.Biodiv.500 Biological and forensic trace interpretation
6
4
L: Degraded DNA - Introduction and basics of analysis
L: Basics of biological trace interpretation and forensic anthropology
3
3
M.Biodiv.505 Anthropology I: Structure Analysis
6
8
S: Structure analysis of unburnt and burnt skeleton material
P: Macro- and microscopic analyses of human hard tissue
3
3
M.Biodiv.506 Anthropology II: Palaeogenetics
6
8
S: Basics of typing of strongly degraded DNA
P: Genetic typing of (pre-)historic skeleton material
3
3
M.Agr.0009 Biological Control and Biodiversity
6
4
L/P: Biological control and biodiversity
6
M.Bio.101 General and Applied Microbiology
12
14
L: General and applied microbiology
S: General and applied microbiology
P: Signal transduction in bacteria or Isolation and characterisation of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms
4.5
1.5
6
M.Bio.346
Introduction into Behavioural Biology
6
4
L: Introduction into behavioural biology
S: Concepts of behavioural biology
3
3

Semester 4 (Summer Term):

Mandatory teaching unit: Master’s Thesis Research Project: 30 C